Wreckless Eric

Musician — New York

Name?
My name is Eric Goulden, I’m also known as Wreckless Eric.

Describe your style in three words?
Elegantly scruffy, charming (mostly).

What’s the best gig you’ve ever been to?
The Pink Floyd at the Brighton Dome in 1968. You could see how it was done, but it was still utterly cosmic. No band, sound system, light show or other paraphernalia has ever had such a profound effect on me.

If you could be on the line up with any two bands in history?
The Byrds supported by Mighty Baby at Middle Earth in London in (I think) 1970. I’d be the solo second support, and I’d hang out with my dear late friend Martin Stone (guitarist in Mighty Baby), and we’d get to see the Byrds together.

Which Subcultures have influenced you?
The British underground of the late sixties, Rave and DJ culture of the 1990’s though I couldn’t do the substances so I could really only view it from the sidelines.

If you could spend an hour with anyone from history?
It wouldn’t work - the problem is that the person from history would have no idea who I was so the encounter would be very one-sided. But if pushed, Neil Young, with the proviso that he‘s completely aware of me and what I do, and it’s a meeting of minds.

Of all the venues you’ve played, which is your favourite?
It’s always subject to change, but right now it’s Third Man Records in Detroit. It has Jack White’s personal imprint all over it. He understands the trials and tribulations of the touring musician, so there are people on hand to help bring in the equipment, there’s an incredibly well-appointed hospitality suite with a huge luxury bathroom containing every quality hair care product known to man, a clean stage with a great PA system... There were beautiful men and women in wacky black and yellow uniforms on hand to deal with the slightest mundane request and to just generally be kind... it made me want to cry!

Your greatest hero or heroine in music?
They all have equal placing - Syd Barrat, Jimi Hendrix, the Soft Machine, Bo Diddley, Hubert Sumlin, John Lee Hooker, Chuck Berry, Jarvis Cocker, Amy Rigby, Amy Allison (daughter of Mose Allison), Joe Ely, and seventy-two others.


Despite his reputation as an underground artist, Eric Goulden (better known as Wreckless Eric) became a household name in 1977 with songs such as 'Whole Wide World', released through Stiff Records. Eric released two albums during the Stiff heydey alongside his Stiff contemporaries Ian Dury and The Blockheads, Nick Lowe, The Damned and Elvis Costello. In 1980 Eric left the label but continued to perform and record prolifically throughout the '80s, '90s up to the present day, with works including his current album 'Construction Time & Demolition'. Catch Eric live in the UK throughout May (2018) including a gig at The 100 Club, London on 24th May.

wrecklesseric.com 

The first track you played on repeat?
'I Saw Her Standing There' by The Beatles

A song that defines the teenage you?
'Anyway Anyhow Anywhere' by The Who

One record you would keep forever?
The first Pink Floyd album, 'Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' - BUT ONLY THE MONO VERSION!!!

A song lyric that has inspired you? 
I wish that for just one time you could stand inside my shoes
And just for that one moment I could be you
I wish that for just one time you could stand inside my shoes
You'd know what a drag it is to see you
(Bob Dylan, 'Positively 4th Street').

A song you wished you had written?
'Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep' by Middle Of The Road

A song people wouldn’t expect you to like?
'I Feel Love' by Donna Summer

Best song to end an all-nighter?
'Bar Italia' by Pulp

Any new bands you are into at the moment?
Slushy Pop from Chicago - they opened for me in Chicago and I insisted that they play acoustically rather than as an electric rock band, and hopefully it opened them up to something. John Krautner from Detroit - He opened for me solo in Detroit, played all these songs on a Spanish guitar.

Name?
My name is Eric Goulden, I’m also known as Wreckless Eric.

Describe your style in three words?
Elegantly scruffy, charming (mostly).

What’s the best gig you’ve ever been to?
The Pink Floyd at the Brighton Dome in 1968. You could see how it was done, but it was still utterly cosmic. No band, sound system, light show or other paraphernalia has ever had such a profound effect on me.

If you could be on the line up with any two bands in history?
The Byrds supported by Mighty Baby at Middle Earth in London in (I think) 1970. I’d be the solo second support, and I’d hang out with my dear late friend Martin Stone (guitarist in Mighty Baby), and we’d get to see the Byrds together.

Which Subcultures have influenced you?
The British underground of the late sixties, Rave and DJ culture of the 1990’s though I couldn’t do the substances so I could really only view it from the sidelines.

If you could spend an hour with anyone from history?
It wouldn’t work - the problem is that the person from history would have no idea who I was so the encounter would be very one-sided. But if pushed, Neil Young, with the proviso that he‘s completely aware of me and what I do, and it’s a meeting of minds.

Of all the venues you’ve played, which is your favourite?
It’s always subject to change, but right now it’s Third Man Records in Detroit. It has Jack White’s personal imprint all over it. He understands the trials and tribulations of the touring musician, so there are people on hand to help bring in the equipment, there’s an incredibly well-appointed hospitality suite with a huge luxury bathroom containing every quality hair care product known to man, a clean stage with a great PA system... There were beautiful men and women in wacky black and yellow uniforms on hand to deal with the slightest mundane request and to just generally be kind... it made me want to cry!

Your greatest hero or heroine in music?
They all have equal placing - Syd Barrat, Jimi Hendrix, the Soft Machine, Bo Diddley, Hubert Sumlin, John Lee Hooker, Chuck Berry, Jarvis Cocker, Amy Rigby, Amy Allison (daughter of Mose Allison), Joe Ely, and seventy-two others.


Despite his reputation as an underground artist, Eric Goulden (better known as Wreckless Eric) became a household name in 1977 with songs such as 'Whole Wide World', released through Stiff Records. Eric released two albums during the Stiff heydey alongside his Stiff contemporaries Ian Dury and The Blockheads, Nick Lowe, The Damned and Elvis Costello. In 1980 Eric left the label but continued to perform and record prolifically throughout the '80s, '90s up to the present day, with works including his current album 'Construction Time & Demolition'. Catch Eric live in the UK throughout May (2018) including a gig at The 100 Club, London on 24th May.

wrecklesseric.com 

The first track you played on repeat?
'I Saw Her Standing There' by The Beatles

A song that defines the teenage you?
'Anyway Anyhow Anywhere' by The Who

One record you would keep forever?
The first Pink Floyd album, 'Piper At The Gates Of Dawn' - BUT ONLY THE MONO VERSION!!!

A song lyric that has inspired you? 
I wish that for just one time you could stand inside my shoes
And just for that one moment I could be you
I wish that for just one time you could stand inside my shoes
You'd know what a drag it is to see you
(Bob Dylan, 'Positively 4th Street').

A song you wished you had written?
'Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep' by Middle Of The Road

A song people wouldn’t expect you to like?
'I Feel Love' by Donna Summer

Best song to end an all-nighter?
'Bar Italia' by Pulp

Any new bands you are into at the moment?
Slushy Pop from Chicago - they opened for me in Chicago and I insisted that they play acoustically rather than as an electric rock band, and hopefully it opened them up to something. John Krautner from Detroit - He opened for me solo in Detroit, played all these songs on a Spanish guitar.

Wreckless Eric - 'They Don't Mean No Harm'

Wreckless Eric - 'Whole Wide World'

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