Arthur Smilios

Musician — New York

Name, where are you from?
Arthur Smilios, born and raised (and most likely going to die) in New York City.

What do you do?
I am the manager of the New York Wooster shop and bassist for Gorilla Biscuits.

Describe your style in three words:
Retro Modern Dandy.

Which music defines the teenage you?
British Punk, especially The Clash. Joe taught me about politics and Paul was the standard of cool.

What new music/bands are you listening to?
Dead Heavens, a local NYC band who is destined for great things; Youth Code, from Los Angeles; Leon Bridges. Sharp Shock, out of LA. They are composed of a Brit, New Zealander, and an American, so they reflect the cosmopolitan nature of Mod. They remind me of The Jam—especially Davey’s vocals.

What was the first song you played on repeat?
“My Generation,” by The Who. It spoke to angry teenage me, and as an aspiring bassist, John Entwistle’s four-bar solos are both mind-bending and iconic.

A song from your favourite album?
"Hey Now!” from What’s the Story (Morning Glory)?

A song you wish you’d written?
“Uptight,” by Stevie Wonder.

A British icon or band who inspire your sound?
The Who, Oasis, The Clash, and The Beatles—to name but four of about 1,429.

What is the last piece of music you bought?
I’m on a Motown kick lately, so it’s most likely early Stevie Wonder or Smokey Robinson; Noel Gallagher’s latest, “Who Built the Moon?”

Best song to bring people together?
“All You Need is Love,” by The Beatles.

What has been your all-time favourite gig?
The Pogues/Billy Bragg, at Roseland Ballroom; The Who/The Clash, at Shea Stadium.

Best love song of all time?
“Rainy Night in Soho,” by The Pogues; “Maybe I’m Amazed,” by Paul McCartney; “She is Love,” by Oasis.

Is there a song you like that people wouldn’t expect?
Anything from Neil Diamond. He is a fellow New York native, who has a knack for writing a good tune—plus, I grew up listening to him, as my parents were huge fans.

Name, where are you from?
Arthur Smilios, born and raised (and most likely going to die) in New York City.

What do you do?
I am the manager of the New York Wooster shop and bassist for Gorilla Biscuits.

Describe your style in three words:
Retro Modern Dandy.

Which music defines the teenage you?
British Punk, especially The Clash. Joe taught me about politics and Paul was the standard of cool.

What new music/bands are you listening to?
Dead Heavens, a local NYC band who is destined for great things; Youth Code, from Los Angeles; Leon Bridges. Sharp Shock, out of LA. They are composed of a Brit, New Zealander, and an American, so they reflect the cosmopolitan nature of Mod. They remind me of The Jam—especially Davey’s vocals.

What was the first song you played on repeat?
“My Generation,” by The Who. It spoke to angry teenage me, and as an aspiring bassist, John Entwistle’s four-bar solos are both mind-bending and iconic.

A song from your favourite album?
"Hey Now!” from What’s the Story (Morning Glory)?

A song you wish you’d written?
“Uptight,” by Stevie Wonder.

A British icon or band who inspire your sound?
The Who, Oasis, The Clash, and The Beatles—to name but four of about 1,429.

What is the last piece of music you bought?
I’m on a Motown kick lately, so it’s most likely early Stevie Wonder or Smokey Robinson; Noel Gallagher’s latest, “Who Built the Moon?”

Best song to bring people together?
“All You Need is Love,” by The Beatles.

What has been your all-time favourite gig?
The Pogues/Billy Bragg, at Roseland Ballroom; The Who/The Clash, at Shea Stadium.

Best love song of all time?
“Rainy Night in Soho,” by The Pogues; “Maybe I’m Amazed,” by Paul McCartney; “She is Love,” by Oasis.

Is there a song you like that people wouldn’t expect?
Anything from Neil Diamond. He is a fellow New York native, who has a knack for writing a good tune—plus, I grew up listening to him, as my parents were huge fans.

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