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Nia Archives

Musician — Manchester / London

Name, where are you from?
Nia Archives - Manchester, but I’m currently living in East London.

Describe your style in three words?
Casual, reworked, retro.

What’s the best gig you’ve ever been to?
A few years back, Freddie McGregor performed at Leeds West Indian Carnival - it was sick! The energy was pure, people were skanking and vibing to the music. I remember being blown away by the tunes and feeling so blessed to see him perform.

If you could be on the line up with any two artists in history?
That is a difficult one as there are so many artists I'd absolutely love to share a stage with. Truthfully though, I'd be buzzing to be on the same lineup as M.I.A - she is too cold! Growing up I would gass over her tunes and her energy. It would also be sick to be on the same bill as Four Tet, his tunes give me so much life and really take me on a sonic journey. Plus the visual element of his live performances is wicked.

Which subcultures have influenced you?
Black British culture has shaped me both culturally and musically as an individual. Growing up with a mixed heritage; I have always been proud of my British and Jamaican roots. From young, I was exposed to so many different types of music like reggae, gospel, soul and jungle. Being a northerner has also played a part. Originally I’m from West Yorkshire, but I moved to Manchester in my teens and really experienced that true northern soul there. Equally coming down to London, I find inspiration from just being in the city. The UK rave culture has had a big influence on me and my music, I love raving and the history that surrounds the underground scene.

If you could spend an hour with anyone from history?
I have always admired Maya Angelou, her words and wisdom never cease to amaze me, I used to read a lot of her books and poems; it would be an honour to be in her presence. For musicians, I'm tempted to say Burial as I am a big fan and would love to have a conversation with him. But it would be wicked to meet Aphex Twin, his productions are levels and the way that his mind works is phenomenal - it'd definitely be an interesting hour.

Of all the venues you’ve been to or played, which is your favourite?
I have a soft spot for Band On The Wall in Manchester, I've seen so many sick artists perform there; plus the events that they put on are always so good. There is so much history at Band On The Wall, it is a living music library and a real hub for live music in Manchester.

Your greatest unsung hero or heroine in music?
I absolutely adore Jennifer Lara, her tunes are so real; I just love her vibe. I am inspired by Kemistry, DJ Flight and Sherelle, they are all wicked. What they represent is massive, and it is great to see black women taking up space. Also, shout out Zsa Zsar, she is crucial to the scene and the loveliest person you will meet.

The first track you played on repeat?
'Welcome To Jamrock' by Damian Marley.

A song that defines the teenage you?
'Movements' by Roots Manuva.

One record you would keep forever?
'LK feat Stamina MC (Carol Carolina Bela)' by DJ Marky, XRS.

A song lyric that has inspired you?
"Don't you know, talkin' bout a revolution sounds like a whisper..."

From 'Talkin' Bout A Revolution' by Tracy Chapman.

The song that would get you straight on the dance floor?
'Rodent' by Burial.

A song you wished you had written?
'He Can Only Hold Her' by Amy Winehouse.

Best song to turn up loud?
'Keep The Fire Burning' by The House Crew.

A song people wouldn’t expect you to like?
'This Must Be The Place' by Talking Heads.

Best song to end an all-nighter on?
'New Forms' by Roni Size.

Any new music you are listening to right now?
'Warrior Chant' by IZCO.
'Take it Further' by BAKEY.
'ALMOST BLUE' by L U C Y.
'WestBorn' by P-Rallel.

Name, where are you from?
Nia Archives - Manchester, but I’m currently living in East London.

Describe your style in three words?
Casual, reworked, retro.

What’s the best gig you’ve ever been to?
A few years back, Freddie McGregor performed at Leeds West Indian Carnival - it was sick! The energy was pure, people were skanking and vibing to the music. I remember being blown away by the tunes and feeling so blessed to see him perform.

If you could be on the line up with any two artists in history?
That is a difficult one as there are so many artists I'd absolutely love to share a stage with. Truthfully though, I'd be buzzing to be on the same lineup as M.I.A - she is too cold! Growing up I would gass over her tunes and her energy. It would also be sick to be on the same bill as Four Tet, his tunes give me so much life and really take me on a sonic journey. Plus the visual element of his live performances is wicked.

Which subcultures have influenced you?
Black British culture has shaped me both culturally and musically as an individual. Growing up with a mixed heritage; I have always been proud of my British and Jamaican roots. From young, I was exposed to so many different types of music like reggae, gospel, soul and jungle. Being a northerner has also played a part. Originally I’m from West Yorkshire, but I moved to Manchester in my teens and really experienced that true northern soul there. Equally coming down to London, I find inspiration from just being in the city. The UK rave culture has had a big influence on me and my music, I love raving and the history that surrounds the underground scene.

If you could spend an hour with anyone from history?
I have always admired Maya Angelou, her words and wisdom never cease to amaze me, I used to read a lot of her books and poems; it would be an honour to be in her presence. For musicians, I'm tempted to say Burial as I am a big fan and would love to have a conversation with him. But it would be wicked to meet Aphex Twin, his productions are levels and the way that his mind works is phenomenal - it'd definitely be an interesting hour.

Of all the venues you’ve been to or played, which is your favourite?
I have a soft spot for Band On The Wall in Manchester, I've seen so many sick artists perform there; plus the events that they put on are always so good. There is so much history at Band On The Wall, it is a living music library and a real hub for live music in Manchester.

Your greatest unsung hero or heroine in music?
I absolutely adore Jennifer Lara, her tunes are so real; I just love her vibe. I am inspired by Kemistry, DJ Flight and Sherelle, they are all wicked. What they represent is massive, and it is great to see black women taking up space. Also, shout out Zsa Zsar, she is crucial to the scene and the loveliest person you will meet.

The first track you played on repeat?
'Welcome To Jamrock' by Damian Marley.

A song that defines the teenage you?
'Movements' by Roots Manuva.

One record you would keep forever?
'LK feat Stamina MC (Carol Carolina Bela)' by DJ Marky, XRS.

A song lyric that has inspired you?
"Don't you know, talkin' bout a revolution sounds like a whisper..."

From 'Talkin' Bout A Revolution' by Tracy Chapman.

The song that would get you straight on the dance floor?
'Rodent' by Burial.

A song you wished you had written?
'He Can Only Hold Her' by Amy Winehouse.

Best song to turn up loud?
'Keep The Fire Burning' by The House Crew.

A song people wouldn’t expect you to like?
'This Must Be The Place' by Talking Heads.

Best song to end an all-nighter on?
'New Forms' by Roni Size.

Any new music you are listening to right now?
'Warrior Chant' by IZCO.
'Take it Further' by BAKEY.
'ALMOST BLUE' by L U C Y.
'WestBorn' by P-Rallel.

Nia Archives | Crossroads (2021)

Nia Archives | Headz Gone West (2021)